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Armed Forces, the State, and Society in Southeast Asia: Identity, Authority, and Legitimacy
Start Date: 11/2/2018Start Time: 2:30 PM
End Date: 11/2/2018End Time: 5:30 PM

Event Description:

CGA Conference on Armed Forces, the State, and Society in Southeast Asia: Identity, Authority, and Legitimacy

Unfortunately, this event has been cancelled.

What is the relationship between the military and political authority? Civil-military relations theory proceeds from a central normative premise: the military must not be involved in politics.  Samuel Huntington, for instance, claims that militaries should be content with having autonomy over their professional affairs in exchange for non-interference in the political realm - a system that legitimizes both bodies. In Southeast Asia today, there exists a range of civil-military relations along a spectrum. Some countries (such as Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines) operate, at least nominally, under a system in which civilian political leadership is firmly and clearly in control. In others, the military operates explicitly (Vietnam and Lao PDR) or implicitly (Cambodia) as a tool of the ruling political party. Indonesia is a former military dictatorship that has reformed its armed forces; Myanmar, operates what might be called a transitional model.  Thailand today remains under military rule, with the possibility of extended military oversight of the political system for some time to come.

This conference explores how these two perspectives (the theoretical and the actual) combine in Southeast Asia today and how issues of legitimacy are managed, conferred, and maintained across the region.

Moderator: Christopher Ankersen, Clinical Associate Professor, NYU SPS Center for Global Affairs


Location Information:
Downtown - Woolworth  (View Map)
15 Barclay Street (bet. Broadway and Church Street)
New York, NY
Room: 430
Contact Information:
Phone: 212-992-8380
Email: scps.global.affairs@nyu.edu

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